Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Women : Crossing the Threshold

In the 1890's when two friends Kashibai Kanitkar and Anandibai Joshi stepped out of their homes wearing shoes and carrying umbrellas they were pelted with stones. Within a decade Kashibai Kanitkar started writing novels in Marathi and Anandibai qualified as a doctor in America.
In the early part of the 19th century whether a female child would be allowed to live at all depended on the region and the community in which she was born. Female infanticide was rampant in the country, particularly in the North in the 18th century and in the early part of the 19th century.
If a girl was allowed to live and grow up she was married and packed off to her husband's house even before she outgrew her childhood. A girl of those days did not know of an intermediary stage between childhood
and motherhood. When an eleven-year-old girl named Phulmani fell a victim to her adult husband's passion there was a public outcry. 1500 women signed a petition to Queen Victoria appealing to her to raise the age of consent and finally the Bill of Age of Consent was passed in 1891, prohibiting cohabitation with a wife under the age of 12.
Child widows, if they were not forced to become satis as in Bengal, Rajasthan and some other parts of the country were made to live a life of degradation. While Raja Ram Mohan Roy successfully campaigned for abolition of Sati, his contemporary Ishwarchandra Vidyasagar launched a movement for widow re-marriage. It gladdened his heart when his own son married a widow in 1856. Behramji Malbari, a Parsee, worked relentlessly to promote the concept of widow remarriage in western India.
Dewan Bahadur Raghunath Rao in Madras and Virasalingam in Rajahmundry were two other stalwarts of the widow re-marriage movement.

       Go to   Next Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.