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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Swadeshi Enterprise

The Tagores of Jorasanko were pioneers in the Swadeshi movement. They helped Nabagopal Mitra in starting the chaitra or Hinu Mela in 1867 with exihibitions of indigenous crafts as one of its principal features. The matches sold in this mela refused to lit. What kept it burning was the fierce patriotic ferver!
Jyotindranath Tagore launched in 1884 Inland River Steam Nvigation Service with five ships which carried passengers between Khulna and Barisal and cargo up to Calcutta. Barisal students brought passengers to the Swadeshi ships. When the rival British Company reduced its rate, the youth of Barisal kept singing songs upholding the virtue of swadeshi! The Tagores felt carried away to the extent of virtually offering free rides with free meals thrown in as the added incentive! In his reminiscences Rabindranath Tagore has fondly recalled this romantic phase of Swadeshi.
But Pramathnath Bose, the pioneer in technical education in India was a realist. In 1886, he advocated technical education as the lasting foundation for developing indegenous industries in areas like textiles, dyeing, tannery, sugar-refining, soap and glass manufacturing, mining and metallurgy.
The Association for the Advancement of Scientific and Industrial Federation of Indians founded by Jogendrachandra Ghosh in 1904 started funding students to go abroad to train themselves in science and technology. It collected money from the public. Even village schools contributed — the school committee of a Vikrampur village, for instance, decided to raise the school fee of each student by a farthing per mansem in aid of Industrial ansd Scientific Association in Calcutta! In 1906, fourty four students were sent abroad. Interestingly, the orthodox ban on sea-voyages was lifted so that the sons of the soil could go abroad for technical education!
These students did come back to India after their training abroad and set up a number of Swadeshi industrities.
Bengal Chemical and Pharmaceutical Works founded by the Prafulla Chandra Ray in 1893 started producing drugs both Ayurvedic and Allopatnic. The company started making laboratory equipments also.
Satya Sunder Deb who returned from Japan with training in ceramics started a factory in 1906 which manufactured Swadeshi tea cups, saucers and tea pots. Parents bought for their children Swadeshi dolls made of China clay!

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