Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Saga of Indian Revolutionaries

In the post-1857 period the first man to strike a blow for swaraj was Vasudev Balwant Phadke – a revolutionary. The Indian struggle for independence was dominated first by constitutionalists who believed in petitions and public debates and later by peaceful agitationalists like Tilak and Gandhiji. But, whenever there was a lull in mainstream political activities, the revolutionaries would take over. As the swadeshi movement in protest against the partition of Bengal gradually lost its tempo, the younger activists who had taken part in the agitation, formed revolutionary groups that threw up martyrs like Susheel Sen and Khudiram Bose. After Tilak's deportation to Mandalay in 1908 there was a spurt in revolutionary activities which resulted in the so-called Nasik Conspiracy in India and the assassination of Curzon Wylie in London. An unending series of revolutionary activities in Bengal, Punjab, United Provinces (UP) and Maharashtra led to the appointment of the Rowlatt Committee. The Rowlatt Committee submitted a detailed report on revolutionary activities right from the killing of Rand by the Chaphekar brothers in 1897 to the bomb attack on Viceroy Lord Hardinge in 1912. It was to counteract revolutionary activities that the Rowlatt Committee conceived the two Rowlatt bills which triggered off country-wide protests and culminated in the massacre at Jallianwala Bagh. After Jallianwala Bagh the struggle for freedom grew more defiant and even those who had admiration for the western democratic institutions and methods no longer trusted the British sense of justice and fair play.
Gandhiji's emergence as the undisputed leader of the Indian masses had as its backdrop the Jallianwala Bagh tragedy which was the direct outcome of the agitation launched by Gandhiji against the Rowlatt bills. Thus paradoxically, the revolutionaries and Gandhiji who represented two extremes of the Indian struggle were in a way interconnected, notwithstanding the fact that Gandhiji abhorred violence.
After Jallianwala Bagh, many young men burning with patriotic fervour including Chandrasekhar Azad and Bhagat Singh, joined Gandhiji's non-violent, non-cooperation movement. It was only when Gandhiji abruptly called off the non-cooperation movement in 1922 that some of his followers took the path of violence.
Between 1922 and 1924, Alluri Sitaram Raju led the tribals of the Rampa sub-division, in the Telugu region of South India, in an uprising against the British. On 23 September, 1922 he and his men destroyed an army contingent at Damanapalli Ghat. The British mounted a massive operation to crush the uprising but it took them more than a year to subdue the tribals and capture Raju whom they immediately shot dead.

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