Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Apostle of Peace

When the Second World War ended in Europe, people in India hoped that Britain would soon grant freedom to the country.
Their hopes rose when in June 1945 the government released Congress leaders from jail and lifted the ban on the Congress. Prospects of gaining independence brightened when the Labour Party came to power in Britain in mid-July. The Labour Party was sympathetic to the Indian cause.
General elections were held in 1945 and the Congress swept the polls winning over 90 per cent of votes in the general constituencies. The Muslim League improved dramatically on its performance in the 1937 elections by capturing 75 per cent of the Muslim votes in the country. The party formed governments in Bengal, Assam and Sind. The Congress formed governments in all the other provinces except Punjab where a coalition that included Muslims, Sikhs and Hindus, took over.
Meanwhile, Viceroy Wavell had come to the conclusion that Britain could no longer hold India. He made it known to London that if Congress were to launch another agitation on the lines of the 1942 Quit India movement, Britain would not be able to control the situation. The police were demoralised because men whom they had ill-treated and put behind bars during the 1942 agitation were now ministers and could take action against them; the army had too few soldiers — only about 50,000 to maintain internal security and Britain could not spare any more British troops.
In March 1946, a team of three British ministers, sometimes known as the 'Cabinet Mission' arrived in India to work out a formula for the transfer of power to India.
The Muslim League put forward the demand for a separate sovereign state of Pakistan to safeguard what it called the Muslim interests. This was vehemently opposed by the Congress. Maulana Abdul Kalam Azad, a renowned Islamic scholar, and the then president of the Congress came out strongly against the formation of Pakistan. He pointed out that in an undivided India there would be 90 million Muslims and though they would be outnumbered they would still be strong enough to hold their own, whereas if the country were divided, the Muslims remaining in India would number only about 35 million, making them a weak minority.

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