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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

The British Raj in Black and White

The early Europeans who came to India in search of fortunes were overawed by "Oriental Splendour" and meekly waited upon Mughal emperors, while seeking trade concessions. When the British gained a firm foothold in Bengal, scholars like William Jones studied Sanskrit works and discovered the depth of Indian culture which they came to admire. However, as British power increased, the British became contemptuous of the conquered people. On his arrival in India, Governor-General Marquess of Hastings credited the people of India with 'no higher intellect than a dog and an elephant or a monkey might be supposed capable of attaining'.
Prof T.G.P. Spear noted with concern that "the attitude of the average Englishman changed from one of disapproval …into one of contempt for an inferior and conquered people." This attitude of Englishmen was due to a sense of racial superiority. "A cherished conviction which was shared by every Englishman in India, from the highest to the lowest," wrote Wilfred Blunt, "was that he belongs to the race whom God has destined to govern and subdue." This superiority complex was the extension of the feeling of superiority of the white race over the black which swept the whole of Europe during the nineteenth century.
This attitude was reflected in the way the British officials behaved in India causing untold misery to the people.
Like the black populations of Africa and the southern states of the USA, Indians had to put up with insult and injury at the hands of the whites.
Wilfred Blunt recalls an incident in Patna when he was being seen off by Nawab Vilayet Ali Khan accompanied by 30 leading citizens. "There was neither obstruction, nor noise, nor crowding," writes Blunt. "But the presence of 'natives' on the platform became suddenly distasteful to an English passenger in the adjoining compartment. Thrusting his head out of the window he began to abuse them and bid them off, and when they did not move, struck at them with his stick and threatened the old Nawab especially with it if he came within his reach. …the railway officials and police treated it as a matter of small importance, and did their best to screen the offender."
When Blunt narrated the Patna incident to his Indian friends in Bombay he was informed that every native in Bombay had been subjected to such incidents! Mr. Mandalik, a government pleader told Blunt that on one occasion he was thrown out of the railway carriage between Benaras and Allahabad because a white passenger objected to an Indian sharing his compartment.
Later Blunt received letters from his friends in Patna. "I beg to assure you," one of them wrote, "that the incident was not (an only) one of its kind, but such treatment is becoming general… Alas! we are hated for no other reason but because we have a dark colour, because we put on a national dress and because we are a conquered race ... Allow me to say that it will be difficult for England to hold India long if such a state of feeling is allowed to progress without any check."

Salaam, Sahib

January 1, 1809. At about 4 o'clock Raja Rammohan Roy was passing through Bhagalpur. The Raja was being carried in a palanquin. As the door of the palanquin was shut, the Raja did not see Sir Hamilton, the District Collector passing by. The Collector was furious at being ignored by a native. He shouted at the palanquin bearers. When the Raja got out of the palanquin to see what the commotion was about, he was greeted by the choicest of abuses. The Raja had to pacify the irate Collector by saluting the official as demanded, and tender an apology.
On his return to Calcutta the Raja sent a petition to Lord Minto the Governor-General protesting against the rude behaviour of the Collector.
Routledge in his book "English Rule and Native Opinion in India," refers to Englishmen pushing through crowds of people as through a herd of cattle.
Sir Henry Cotton writes: "It is but too common an outrage to assault respectable residents of the country because when passing on the road they have not dismounted from their horses in token of their inferiority. I have known a case in which an unfortunate old man died from the effects of blows so received."

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