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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Gandhi in Champaran

After his release from prison, Bal Gangadhar Tilak along with Annie Besant plunged into the Home Rule agitation.
Home Rule meant the country would govern itself but the British monarch would remain the head of the government.
When the government tried to place restrictions on Tilak and demanded a personal surety bond of 20,000 rupees, he contested the order. Tilak's case was brilliantly argued by barrister Muhammad Ali Jinnah who got the order quashed by the court.
The Lucknow Congress of 1916 witnessed the return of Lokmanya Tilak to the Congress. The Congress president Ambica Charan Muzumdar hailed the return of Tilak saying that "Brothers have at last met brothers." It was at the Lucknow Congress too that differences between the Congress and the Muslim League were ironed out enabling the two parties to come together to work for the common goal of self-rule.
Bal Gangadhar Tilak wrote in 'Kesari' : "When Hindus and Muslims jointly ask for Swarajya from a common platform, the British bureaucracy has to realise that its days are numbered."
In a public speech in Pune on December 30, 1916, Tilak made his now famous declaration : "Swaraj is my birth right and I shall have it."
Annie Besant who initiated the Home Rule agitation, in a message to British labourers pleaded: “Help us to become a free commonwealth under the British crown... our people have died in your war for freedom. Will you consent that the children of our dead shall remain a subject race?”
The Home Rule agitation was a landmark on the road to freedom. All communities participated in the agitation.
While Tilak was busy with the Home Rule agitation, M.K. Gandhi who had returned to India was travelling through the length and breadth of the country. Everywhere he went he saw poverty, ignorance, superstition, prejudice and suffering.
He was a man of action. If he found the surroundings unclean, he was quite capable of asking for a broom and sweeping out the dirt himself. He was also a man who could think clearly. He believed in studying a problem objectively before chalking out a plan of action based on what he called Satya, truth and Ahimsa, non-violence.

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