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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

"Leave India to God… or to Anarchy"

The Congress called off the Civil Disobedience movement in 1934 by which time the movement had run out of steam. In June the same year the government lifted the ban on the Congress.
In the 1937 elections held under the 1935 Act the Congress swept the polls in 9 provinces. In July the Congress ministries assumed office in Madras, Bombay, Central Provinces, Orissa, Bihar and the United Provinces. Later it formed ministries in Assam and the North-west Frontier Province. However, it did not do well in Muslim constituencies. It contested 56 out of 482 Muslim seats and won only 28. The Muslim League which claimed to represent Muslim interests did not fare well either. It obtained only 4.8 per cent of the Muslim vote, winning only 43 out of 272 Muslim seats in the Muslim majority provinces of Punjab, Sind, North-west Frontier and Bengal.
The Congress refused to recognise the Muslim League as the sole custodian of Muslim interests and maintained that the Congress represented the whole nation and all its people regardless of their religious affiliations.
However, M.A. Jinnah, who after the 1937 elections had brought various regional Muslim groups under the Muslim League banner strongly contested the Congress claim to represent the whole country and said that Hindus and Muslims were two nations.
Inspite of the bickering between the Congress and the Muslim League the formation of popular ministries electrified the nation. "…There was a release of long-suppressed mass energy which was evident everywhere…" Jawaharlal Nehru wrote in Discovery of India. "…hordes of people, from the city and the village entered these sacred precincts (headquarters of the provincial governments) and roamed about almost at will. They were interested in anything; they went into the Assembly chambers where the sessions used to be held; they even peeped into ministers' rooms. It was difficult to stop them for they no longer felt as outsiders; they had a sense of ownership…"
The people had tasted power and there was no going back on Purna Swaraj. The question of the independence of India assumed importance when the Second World War broke out in 1939. Britain committed India to the war on its side without consulting Indian leaders. The Congress held that Indians should decide whether they wanted to be in the war or not.

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