Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Quit India

With the failure of the Cripp's Mission, Gandhiji came to the conclusion that the best thing Britain could do was simply to quit India — without talks, without proposals, without worrying about the future. The Free Indian would decide what to do with the various problems confronting the nation. The historic All-India Congress Committee session at Gowalia Tank, Mumbai on 8th August 1942 was attended by 7,500 delegates. It was at this session that Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru moved the 'Quit India' resolution. It was seconded by Sardar Patel and passed by an overwhelming majority with only 13 members opposing it.
Gandhiji spoke for two hours. "Every one of you should from this moment," said Gandhiji, "consider yourself a free man or woman and even act as if you are free and no longer under the heel of this imperialism. This is no make - believe. You have to cultivate the spirit of freedom before it comes physically. The chains of a slave are broken the moment he considers himself a free man." In conclusion he said, "Here is a mantra, a short one that I give you. You may imprint it on your hearts and let every breath of yours give expression to it. The mantra is : 'Do or Die'. We shall either free India or die in the attempt; we shall not live to see the perpetuation of our slavery."
On the following day, in the early hours of August 9, the police swooped down on the Congress leaders and arrested Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru, Sardar Patel and several others.
Gandhiji had said that after the arrest of the leaders each person would be his own general and would be expected to "do or die" in the implementation of the "Quit India" resolution. The people of India did exactly that. New groups were formed overnight and new leadership emerged to direct the agitation against British rule in villages, towns and cities. As the government unleashed a reign of terror the movement went underground. The freedom fighters no longer courted arrest to fill the prisons, instead they resorted to hit-and-run tactics and successfully evaded arrest. Jaya Prakash Narayan with his daring escape from the Hazaribagh jail became the symbol of the new spirit of rebellion. Police stations, post offices, courts, railway stations and other symbols of government authority became the targets of attack. Bridges were blown up, railway tracks were removed and telephone and telegraph wires were cut. Thus the movement was certainly not within the 'four corners of non-violence' as Gandhiji wanted it to be. For the first time, after the 1857 mutiny, the government appeared to have lost control.

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