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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

For God and Country

Right From 1757 when the Battle of Plassey took place, to 1857, hardly a year passed without resistance to the expansion and consolidation of the British power in India. Besides the battles the local rulers fought for their territorial rights and the occasional revolts by the sepoys, the British had to put up with civil rebellions, tribal uprisings and peasant movements in various parts of the country.
Some of the early civil rebellions started off as movements of religious reform or purification. Later they became more broad-based and championed the cause of peasants. This brought them in conflict with the zamindars, money-lenders and finally the British authority. The Farazi Movement of Bengal led by Dadu Mian and the Wahabi Movement which spread across the country are two notable examples of how what began essentially as religious movements soon became uprisings against the British Raj.
The Farazi sect was founded by Haji Shariatullah of Faridpur in East Bengal. His son, Dadu Mian (1819–1860) united the cultivators against the tyranny and illegal exactions of landlords. His was the first ever no-tax campaign against the British Government for he believed that all lands belonged to God and no man had the right to demand any taxes. He boycotted courts and himself administered summary justice.
Several times Dadu Mian was tried on various charges such as unlawful assembly, abduction, plunder and even murder. On each occasion he was acquitted as the prosecution found it impossible to get witnesses to give evidence against Dadu Mian. 
The Wahabis, a sect which called upon Muslims to return to pure Islam, carried on an organized struggle against British rule. Its leader Saiyid Ahmed of Rae Bareli (1786–1831) was determined to restore Muslim power in India. Wahabis were most active from 1829 to 1870. Every rank of Muslim society – priests, merchants, soldiers, preachers and peasants took part in the movement which was widespread in Bengal, Bihar, Punjab, North West Frontier Provinces and also in Hyderabad and Madras. Such was the popular appeal of the movement that in the Deccan, women sold their jewels and donated the proceeds to the movement. 

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