Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Carrot and Stick

The initial success of the Swadeshi movement in Bengal gave an impression that the government was losing control. However, by dangling the carrot of reforms in front of the Congress leadership and wielding the stick against those who were vehement in their opposition, the government soon had the situation under control.
Leaders like Bal Gangadhar Tilak, Aurobindo Ghosh, Lala Lajpat Rai and Chidambaram Pillai were keen to continue with the Swadeshi agitation.
Others like Pherozeshah Mehta and Gopal Krishna Gokhale wanted the agitation to be scaled down in order to give the government a chance to carry out the reforms it had promised.
The confrontation between these moderates and the impatient extremists eventually led to a split in the Congress with the extremists going their separate way. This happened at the Surat session of the Congress in 1907.
The split in the Congress came as a shot in the arm for the government. To win over the moderates the government came out with the Indian Councils Act, popularly known as the Morley-Minto reforms. Under this act, an Indian was appointed to the Governor-General's Executive Council and more Indians were admitted as members of the Executive Councils in the provinces. The strength of the Legislative Council was raised but the official and nominated members continued to outnumber the elected members.
Muslims were given separate representation.
The moderates seemed satisfied with these sops but the extremists were furious.
Along with the so-called reforms the government began a campaign of repression. Between November 1907 and August 1910 the government passed several bills that curtailed the rights of citizens.
Under the Prevention of Seditious Meetings Act of 1907, the government, could prevent a speaker from addressing a meeting. It could even deny permission to hold a meeting of 20 persons or more for any purpose.

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