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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

The Himalayan Blunder

Gandhi toured the length and breadth of the country urging people to be non-violent soldiers. He made it clear that there was no place for hatred, in his movement. He expected people to be polite and courteous to government officials even while refusing to co-operate with them.
He would travel in the III class compartments of trains. At every stop, thousands of people would besiege the train and there would be a mad rush to get close to Gandhi or to at least get a glimpse of him. Once, inhabitants of a village desperate to see Gandhi but knowing the train carrying him was not scheduled to halt at their station, squatted on the tracks and brought the train to a stop. It was midnight. "When Gandhi, aroused from deep sleep appeared, the crowd, theretofore boisterous, sank to their knees on the railway platform and wept," records Louis Fischer, Gandhiji's biographer.
By then microphones were available in the country. Gandhi would address mammoth meetings and people would hear him out in rapt silence. He touched the hearts of millions of his countrymen and made each one feel that "unless he co-operated he would delay Swaraj".
The non-co-operation movement made a countrywide impact. The government reacted sharply. Congress and Khilafat volunteer organisations were declared unlawful and front line leaders like the Ali brothers, Chittaranjan Das, Motilal Nehru, Lala Lajpat Rai and Subhas Chandra Bose, were arrested. These harsh measures only served to further alienate the people from the government. In December 1921, Gandhiji decided to organise civil disobedience and chose the taluka of Bardoli in Gujarat as the starting-point. However before the movement could get underway there was an outbreak of mob violence at Chauri Chaura, a village in Uttar Pradesh on 5th February 1922. The mob set a police station on fire and when the policemen ran out they were butchered. Twenty-two policemen were killed.
Gandhiji was stunned when he heard the news. "No provocation can possibly justify brutal murder of men who had been rendered defenceless and who had virtually thrown themselves on the mercy of the mob," said Gandhiji. He now described his call for non-co-operation as a Himalayan blunder. He called off the civil disobedience campaign in Bardoli and announced the withdrawal of the countrywide non-co-operation movement.

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