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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Revolutionaries Outside India

Indian revolutionaries got their weapons from various sources. Foreign sailors coming ashore at Calcutta port were a good source of small arms. Some revolutionaries purchased guns from drug smugglers operating between North India and Turkey. One revolutionary secured employment with a firm of importers and managed to divert ten cases of small arms and ammunition to his colleagues in the movement.
The revolutionaries were also helped by Indians settled abroad. India House established in London by Shyamji Krishnavarma, a follower of Swami Dayanand, was a haven for revolutionaries like V.D. Savarkar, Lala Hardayal and Madanlal Dhingra, the young nationalist who shot dead Curzon Wyllie, advisor to the Secretary of State for India, July 1, 1909.
Shyamji was a Sanskrit scholar turned businessman who had made London his base in 1897. Revolutionaries based in London and Paris could always rely on his support. Among the revolutionaries operating from Paris were Madame Bhikaiji Rustom K.R. Cama, 'Mother of the Indian Revolution' and Sardar Singh Rana. The two attended the International Socialist Congress at Stuttgart, in Germany in 1907, when Madame Cama unfurled the Indian flag.
Many Indian students, after completing their studies in England, returned home with a gift from Savarkar — a Browning pistol. These pistols were popular with the revolutionaries and hundreds found their way into India. A young revolutionary named Chaturbhuj brought in twenty of them, concealed in the false bottom of his suitcase.
Savarkar was arrested and sent back to India to face trial in the Nasik Conspiracy Case. He made a daring bid to escape through the porthole of the ship bringing him to India while it was at Marseilles in France. He swam to shore but was re-captured. He was sentenced to transportation for life in the Andamans where his elder brother, Ganesh Savarkar was already serving a life term.
On 1st November 1913, Indians settled in America (they numbered about 30,000, most of them from the Punjab) formed an association that came to be identified with its weekly paper, Ghadar (Rebellion).

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