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India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
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A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
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The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
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Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
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Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Father of Indian Unrest

In one of his circular letters Hume had asked: "…Is it quite impossible for you to open the eyes of your own country-men?' Bal Gangadhar Tilak did just that. When a terrible famine broke out in Bombay Presidency in 1896, Tilak asked the people to demand the benefits offered by the Famine Relief Code. "When the Queen desires that none should die, when the Governor declares that all should live…" Tilak wrote in his Marathi paper, Kesari, "will you kill yourself by timidity and starvation? If you have money to pay Government dues, pay them by all means. But if you have not, will you sell your things away only to avoid the supposed wrath of subordinate Government officers? Can you not be bold, even when in the grip of death?"
Condemning the food riots, Tilak said, "Why loot the bazaars, go to the collector and tell him to give you work and food. That is his duty." The rent campaign launched by Tilak emboldened the farmers who waved printed copies of the Marathi version of the Famine Relief Code in the faces of the revenue officials who came to collect rents. The days of petitions were over. The days of agitation had begun.
Tilak started Sarvajanik Ganeshotsav or Ganapati festivals in public places in 1893. People who otherwise would not have stepped out of their houses came out into the streets to sing and dance in praise of the god of wisdom and to listen to what their leaders had to say.
Tilak was perhaps the first national leader to realise that the slogan of 'Liberty and Equality' borrowed from the west made no sense to the common man in India. It became clear to him that the concept of freedom had to be linked to a symbol that was understood by all. Reaching back into history he drew from it a hero revered by the masses — the great Shivaji. Shivaji stood for unity and courage and he was synonymous with 'Swaraj'.
Tilak started the practice of holding festivals in Shivaji's honour with the intention of arousing patriotic fervour in the people and succeeded to a great extent.

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