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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities

Though he was unconditionally released from prison in 1924 following severe illness, Gandhiji refused to take part in active politics. Between 1922 and 1930, for eight long years he did a penance of a different kind – he gave his time and energy to the propagation of khadi; to bring about Hindu-Muslim unity and for the upliftment of the depressed classes whom he described as Harijans, Children of God. Some of his colleagues including Motilal Nehru and C. R. Das opted to return to municipal, provincial and legislative councils. Under the Act of 1919 which was implemented in 1921, the number of elected members was raised and Indians could hold office as ministers in charge of minor departments. C. R. Das and Motilal Nehru contended that by entering the legislatures they could air public grievances and also carry on with non-cooperation by obstructing the government within the legislature.
Gandhiji did not oppose his friends who formed the Swaraj party, fought elections and entered legislatures. He only asked them to support his campaign for clothing every Indian in khadi.
He toured the length and breadth of the country promoting khadi. At meetings he would say, "I have come here to do business, to collect money for the spinning wheel and khadi and to sell khadi." Between 1924 and 1927, to use an expression current then, Gandhiji 'spun khadi, drank khadi, ate khadi.'
Some of his friends accused Gandhi of taking the khadi issue too far.
Defending Gandhiji's obsession for khadi his close associate Chakravarti Rajagopalachari addressing a meeting in Ahmedabad said : "In India there are thousands and tens of thousands of villages where men do not get more than 2 1 rupees a month. There is no use shedding tears for them if we won't wear a few yards of khadi which they have manufactured and want us to buy so that they may find a meal. If our hearts were not made of stone we would all be wearing khadi. Khadi means employment for the poor and freedom for India…"

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