Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Gandhi in South Africa

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi was a young barrister practising in Saurashtra in Gujarat. He found it disgusting to pay commissions to those who brought him work and he found the atmosphere of intrigue in Saurashtra's legal circles, suffocating.
Sympathising with his plight his elder brother advised a change of scene.
A Porbander merchant Dada Abdulla who had a trading company in Durban was looking for an Indian lawyer willing to work in South Africa. The pay was good and when the job was offered to Gandhi he had no hesitation in accepting it.
And so in May 1893 the 24-year-old barrister left his native shores to seek his fortune across the seas in distant South Africa.
There he had many strange and unnerving experiences.
Once while travelling from Durban to Pretoria by train, he was thrown out of the first class compartment because his fellow passenger, a white did not want to share the compartment with a coloured man.
Gandhi spent the night in a dark, dank waiting room. He wrote : "It was winter… the cold was extremely bitter, my overcoat was in the luggage but I did not dare to ask for it lest I be insulted again, so I sat and shivered. There was no light in the room…"
It was a time for introspection. He wondered if he should go back to India or stay and fight for his rights.
He decided to stay back and fight the 'colour prejudice'. His decision was to change the course of history not only in South Africa but also in India.
The first batch of indentured labourers from India had arrived at Natal in November 1860. They worked in sugarcane, tea and coffee plantations. When their five-year period of contract expired they continued their stay in Africa. The other class of Indians in South Africa were the traders, mostly Muslim merchants from Gujarat. Their businesses prospered and Indians contributed significantly to the economic growth of South Africa though they formed less than 3% of the population. Alarmed at the growing stature of Indian traders, the whites wanted to put an end to immigration of Indians and placed severe restrictions on their movements, property rights and business activities.

       Go to   Next Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.