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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

The Last War of Independence

Japan inflicted crushing defeats on the British in the early stages of the Second World War in Southeast Asia. Among the prisoners of war taken by the Japanese in Malaya and Singapore, were nearly 45,000 Indian soldiers.
An army officer, Captain Mohan Singh crossed over to the Japanese side during the British retreat and suggested to the Japanese that the Indian POWs could form the nucleus of an Indian national army that could be used to liberate India from the British. The idea appealed to the Japanese and they allowed Captain Singh to talk to the Indian POWs.
"India is on the threshold of freedom," said Captain Singh in his address to the soldiers. "The Japanese have promised us their full support and now it is up to us to organise ourselves and fight for the freedom of our 400 million countrymen."
Over 40,000 POWs enlisted in the Indian National Army which was also known as the Azad Hind Fauj.
Mohan Singh did not stay long at the helm of affairs but the INA found another worthy leader in Rash Behari Bose, the great revolutionary who had made Japan his home.
The arrival of Subhas Chandra Bose in Singapore came as a shot in the arm for the INA. The charismatic leader had long maintained that the British could be dislodged from India only by force of arms. And now here was an army determined to do just that. On July 4, 1943, Rash Behari Bose handed over the leadership of the INA to Subhas Chandra Bose, who thereafter became known as Netaji.
Netaji set up a provisional government of India in Singapore on 21 October 1943, and declared war on Britain and the United States. His government was recognised by the Axis powers and their satellites.
Netaji was determined to recapture the spirit of 1857 and to lead a victorious army into Delhi.
"Delhi Chalo" was the slogan he gave his men and began to raise funds and enlarge his army even putting together an all-woman unit, the aptly named 'Rani of Jhansi Regiment'.
People in India were thrilled to hear Netaji's voice over the Azad Hind Radio broadcasting from Burma while his men were fighting to capture Imphal.
"India's last war of independence has begun," declared Bose and sought the blessings of Mahatma Gandhi whom he referred to as the 'Father of the Nation'.

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