Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Gandhi and Ambedkar

Gandhiji visited England in 1931 to attend the second Round Table Conference which was called to decide the future of India. The conference produced no concrete results. Gandhiji met several people and addressed meetings pleading India's case for freedom.
"How far would you cut India off from the Empire?" Gandhiji was asked. "From the Empire entirely," Gandhiji replied. "From the British nation not at all."
Gandhiji returned to India on December 28, 1931 and in less than one week he was thrown back into Yeravada jail. The Congress was banned and over 80,000 satyagrahis were jailed. Through a series of ordinances the country was brought under 'Civil Martial Law' or martial law under civilian control. Whipping as punishment was re-introduced with a vengeance. Satyagrahis were beaten up and awarded rigorous imprisonment and heavy fines which the government collected by selling their lands and houses at auctions.
Gandhiji was dismayed when the British prime minister announced a separate electorate for the Depressed Classes — the so-called Untouchables.
Gandhiji held that 'a separate electorate for Depressed Classes is harmful for them and for Hinduism... separate electorates would simply vivisect and disrupt it (Hinduism)'. Gandhiji went on a fast unto death. The fast was 'intended to sting Hindu conscience into right religious action.'
The man who was pushing for a separate electorate for the Depressed Classes in the teeth of opposition from national leaders was Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar reverently called 'Babasaheb' by his followers. Twenty per cent of Hindu Society had been branded for centuries as untouchables. The caste Hindus considered their touch, shadow and even voice to be polluting and therefore they were kept away from the mainstream with no rights to education and access to places frequented by the caste Hindus which included waterfronts and temples. They were denied opportunities for self-development.
Well-meaning liberals including Gandhiji tried to bring about a change in the attitude of caste Hindus towards the Depressed Classes so that the social barriers separating them could be dismantled. But these efforts did not bring about any concrete change and exploitation of the depressed classes continued unabated.

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