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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

The Monk Who Shook The Nation

Towards the end of the last century, Indians were a dispirited lot. A century of British rule had sapped their self-confidence. Reform movements had brought about much-needed reforms but at the same time, had exposed the rot that had set into society. Matters were not helped by Christian missionaries from the west constantly ridiculing native religious practices. It was at such a time, when morale was low and foreign influences strong, that a man emerged who was to give his people a new pride in themselves. This was Swami Vivekananda.
The Swami stood like a colossus towering above the inadequacies of a bonded nation. Even while urging his people to think, reform and change, the Swami kept reminding them that they were the torch-bearers of a glorious tradition.
"The Indian nationalist movement smouldered for a long time until Vivekananda's breath blew the ashes into flame and it erupted violently three years after his death in 1905," wrote Romain Rolland.
Subhash Chandra Bose was in agreement with Rolland. "Though the Swami never gave any political message," wrote Bose, "everyone who came into contact with him or his writings developed a spirit of patriotism."
Confirmation of Rolland's theory that Swami Vivekananda was the high priest of Indian nationalism came from the Sedition Committee Report which stated that to the revolutionaries, Vivekananda was god. The personal effects of the revolutionaries usually consisted of a copy of the Gita and volumes of Swami Vivekananda's works.
Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru explains how Vivekananda galvanized the nation, leading it out of self-inflicted fear to the realm of fearlessness. "The one constant refrain of his speech and writing was abhay — be fearless, be strong," wrote Nehru.

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