Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Hunger Deaths

A total of 1.5 million people died of starvation in the seven famines that occurred in the first half of the 19th century. In the second half, there were 24 famines (6 between 1851 and 1875 and 18 between 1876 and 1900) leaving over 20 million dead.
These are official figures. Actual figures could be many times more. Romesh Dutt writes: "Deaths were numerous and were never reckoned... Hundreds of thousands died in obscure villages, unknown and unheeded. The dead lay on the road side unburied and unburnt, till they were devoured by wild animals."
Incredible as it may seem, the export of food grains during this period showed a remarkable increase! The revenue from the export of food grains, principally rice and wheat, rose from £ 858,000 in 1849 to £3.8 million by 1858, £ 7.9 million by 1877, £9.3 million by 1901 and £19.3 million in 1914.
There was never a time when the entire country was under the grip of famine. Famines were regional occurrences. When the rains failed in Bengal, Bombay Presidency had a rich harvest. When North India was reeling under the impact of famine, the South was thriving.
Why then did people die like flies, in hundreds and thousands? Could foodgrains not have been moved from one region to another and human lives saved?
Romesh Dutt writes : "If the people were generally in a prosperous condition, they could make up for local failure of crops by purchases from neighbouring provinces, and there would be no loss of life. But when the people are absolutely resourceless, they cannot buy from surrounding tracts, and they perish in hundreds of thousands, or in millions, whenever there is a local failure of crops."
With the wilful and total destruction of village industries like spinning and weaving and excessive taxation, the people had no savings to fall back on during unexpected calamities like famines.

       Go to   Next Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.