Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Jallianwala — The Aftermath

Following the public outcry against the massacre at Jallianwala Bagh the government was compelled to appoint a committee of enquiry with Sir John Hunter as the chairman. The Congress appointed its own committee with Motilal Nehru as chairman and Gandhiji as one of the members. The reports of these two committees make chilling reading.
Gen. Dyer, appearing before the Hunter Committee, admitted that many people at the meeting in Jallianwala Bagh might not have been aware of the ban on public meetings. Dyer also admitted that he might have been able to disperse the crowd, without firing. He said he fired because if he had dispersed them by other means they would have returned after he had gone and he would have become the butt of ridicule.
Generally, firing is resorted to when repeated warnings to disperse are ignored and even then the objective is to disperse the crowd, not to kill.
Dyer said that his intention in opening fire was not only to disperse the crowd but also to punish the people who had assembled there. So he directed the fire at places where the crowd was the thickest, apparently to 'punish' the maximum number of people. He said he had fired 1650 rounds and stopped only when he ran out of ammunition. He admitted that he had not organised medical aid for the injured. He said it was not his duty to render such help.
After the massacre at Jallianwala Bagh, martial law was declared in the Punjab. The borders were sealed. People were prevented from entering or leaving the state and the press was gagged. For months nobody knew what was happening in the state where the government had let loose a reign of terror. Pedestrians using the narrow street on which Ms Sherwood had been beaten up were forced to crawl on their bellies. No one was spared, not even the very young or the very old or the infirm. For the residents of the area, going out on their work and returning home became an ordeal. To make the local people 'realise' where they stood in relation to the white man, Dyer issued the 'Salaam order,' making it mandatory for Indians to salute passing Europeans.
People were arrested on mere suspicion and flogged mercilessly or were tortured to extract confessions of crimes they had not committed.
Many hotheads in the administration and the army drew inspiration from Gen. Dyer's methods and caused untold misery to the people.

       Go to   Next Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.