Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

The Delhi Durbar

The last 'battle' the East India Company fought to retain its control on India was in England. Soon after the general elections of 1857 in Britain, the Prime Minister announced the decision to bring India under the direct authority of the Crown. The chairman of the Company protested against the decision. The Company submitted a petition to Parliament pleading for the continuation of Company rule in India. However, the petition was brushed aside and on August 2, 1858 the Queen gave her assent to what was called 'An Act for the Better Government of India' and India was brought under the direct rule of the Crown. A month later the board of directors of the Company while transferring power to the Crown said, "Let her Majesty appreciate the gift…" India was certainly a gift as Britain did not have to spend even a penny to acquire it.
The draft of the speech announcing the take-over by the Crown did not meet with the approval of the Queen. She returned it to Prime Minister Lord Derby with instructions to rewrite it, "bearing in mind that it is a female sovereign who speaks to more than a hundred millions of eastern people." The Queen wanted the proclamation to breathe 'feelings of generosity, benevolence and religious toleration'.
The proclamation redrafted and approved by the Queen was publicly read out on 1 November 1858 in all districts and towns of India. For nearly half a century this proclamation was seen by Indians as a charter of their rights.
In 1876, the British parliament passed the Royal Titles Bill and the following year at a durbar held in Delhi Queen Victoria was proclaimed Empress of India.

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