Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Perishing in Peace

In 1860, the newly introduced Licence tax and Income tax were met with wide- spread resentment and hostility.
Though no expert on finance, Govardhan Das, a merchant, refused to fill the income tax form. He attributed Indian poverty to British rule. Economists like Dadabhai Naoroji and Romesh Dutt, also came to the same conclusion after studying the income and expenditure of the British government in India from 1757 to 1900.
"Taxation raised by a king is like the moisture of the earth sucked up by the sun, to be returned to the earth as fertilising rain," wrote Romesh Dutt."But the moisture raised from the Indian soil now descends as fertilising rain largely on other lands, not on India…
…Under wise rulers, as under foolish kings, the proceeds of taxation flowed back to the people and fructified their trade and industries. But a change came over India under the rule of the East India Company. They considered India as a vast estate or plantation, the profits of which were to be withdrawn from India and deposited in Europe."
By the end of the 19th century, nearly half of the annual net revenues went out of the country as 'Home Charges' (see below) and remittances made by European officers to their families abroad.
Sir George Wingate estimated that from the beginning of the 19th century and upto 1858 alone £100 million was taken out of the country as 'Home Charges'. By adding a compound interest of 12%, Montgomery Martin arrived at a staggering figure of £700 million during the first thirty years of the 19th century. And these calculations did not include the sums remitted from India in the 18th century.

       Go to   Next Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.