Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

The Santhals were forced to migrate from their original homeland near Murshidabad on account of the excessive demands of zamindars. They cleared the forests skirting the Raj Mahal Hills with great labour and brought the land they thus acquired under cultivation.
But these simple people fell easy prey to the money-lenders and traders from Bengal and North India who charged high interest on money they lent.
Police and revenue officials lent support to zamindars in claiming cultivable lands from the Santhals for non-payment of dues.
In 1855, under the leadership of two brothers, Sidho and Kanu, who claimed divine revelation, the Santhals set up a government of their own.
They cut off postal and railway communications between Bhagalpur and Raj Mahal and went on a rampage. Such was their fury that they attacked English planters, railway staff, native police-officers, tradesmen and peasants and their families. People fled in terror as wave after wave of Santhals surged through the countryside to the beat of drums.
Even when the disturbed area was handed over to the army the Santhals showed no sign of submission and more than 30,000 men marched towards Calcutta. Hunter, in his Annals of Rural Bengal wrote: "What we fought was not war. So long as their drum went on beating, they went on fighting to the last man." About 20,000 Santhals died and Hunter concludes, "There was not a single sepoy in the British army who did not feel ashamed.

Santhal Hero

BABA TILKA Majhi was a Santhal leader who took up arms against the British in the 1780's.
The British surrounded the Tilapore forest from which he operated but he and his men held the enemy at bay for several weeks.
When he was finally caught in 1784, he was tied to the tail of a horse and dragged all the way to the collector's residence at Bhagalpur. There, his lacerated body was hung from a banyan tree.
A statue to the heroic leader was erected at the spot after independence.

       Go to   Previous Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.