Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

A detachment of the INA had penetrated into India and planted the Indian tricolour at Moirang in Manipur on 14 April, 1944.
If Kohima and Imphal had been captured, the way to Delhi would have been laid open but it was not to be. Torrential rain disrupted supply lines forcing the INA to withdraw to Rangoon, due to a shortage of food and medicine.
Another retreat became necessary when the tide of battle turned in favour of the British.
When Japan conceded defeat, Netaji decided to seek the help of the Soviet Union. Arrangements were made to fly him to Russian-occupied Manchuria and he boarded the Japanese bomber plane that was to take him there on 17 August, 1945 at Saigon, Vietnam. But apparently the plane never reached its destination. It was reported to have crashed on the island of Formosa, killing all its occupants, including Netaji.
The INA soldiers were captured by the victorious Anglo-American forces and brought to India to stand trial.
To the amazement of the British, not only the civilian population but also their owns sepoys and officers hailed the INA soldiers as patriots and raised money for their defence.
Jawaharlal Nehru donned his lawyer's garb after a gap of fifteen years, to come to the defence of the INA heroes in court. The public outcry against the trial ultimately forced the government to call it off. It was the first time that the British government had bowed down to public opinion in India.
That the people had lost all fear of the government became clear when in February 1946, naval ratings in Bombay, Calcutta and Karachi rose in rebellion.
The immediate provocation for the naval mutiny was the bad food served to the ratings. The mutineers also resented discrimination against Indians who had served the empire loyally in the war. B.C. Dutt, a rating, scrawled 'Quit India' on the HMIS Talwar for which he was promptly arrested. Processions were taken out in Bombay expressing solidarity with the ratings. Strikes, hartals and riots triggered off by the naval mutiny shook Bombay. National leaders intervened and persuaded the ratings to surrender on the assurance that no punitive action would be taken against them. Subsequently all the naval mutineers were discharged from service.
By mid-1946, the British writ no longer ran in India. The countdown to Independence had begun.

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