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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Raja Ram Mohan Roy also started a Persian newspaper, Mirat-ul-Akhbar in 1822.
After the suppression of the great revolt of 1857, the battle between the Indians and the Europeans shifted to the pages of the newspapers. The Indian press, by and large, had not lent its support to the revolt but afterwards when the European press mounted an attack on Indians, calling them perfidious and unworthy of trust, the Indian press stoutly defended their countrymen. When Dr. George Buist, Editor of Bombay Times continued his attack on Indians, Mr. Nowroji Furdoonji, one of the Indian shareholders insisted that the editor be asked to moderate his tone. Buist refused to change and he was replaced by Robert Knight.
Under the new editor, the Bombay Times became the leading pro-Indian paper of the Anglo-Indian press.
In the post-revolt years, Harishchandra Mukherjee of the Hindu Patriot, published from Calcutta emerged as an outstanding journalist. He was described as "a terror to the bureaucracy as well as the white colonists and planters in Bengal."
Another distinguished journalist was Man Mohan Ghosh who broke the news of the indigo agitation through the columns of the Hindu Patriot, resulting in the appointment of the 'Indigo Commission of Enquiry'.
In 1862, 1,200 railway workers went on strike at Howrah Railway station demanding an 8-hour working day. Dwarkanath Vidya Bhushan, the editor of Somprakash gave extensive coverage to the strike and wrote in support of the strikers.
Paying rich tribute to the native press of those days Rev. Long wrote: "The native newspapers are humble in appearance, yet like the ballads of a nation they often act where the law fails and as straws on a current they show its direction. In them questions of sati, caste, widow re-marriage, kulin polygamy have been argued with great skill and acuteness on both sides. They have always opposed a foreign language being the language of the courts. The atrocities of indigo planters and the blunders of young magistrates have been laid bare and letters to the editor open out a view of native society nowhere else to be found...
Some of the papers have correspondents and at the time of the Kabul and Punjab Wars accurate information was regularly given of the progress of events".
Newspapers launched in the post 1857 period were more vocal in criticizing the bureaucracy. Amrita Bazar Patrika launched in 1868 by Sisir Kumar Ghose and Motilal Ghose, Bengalee started by Girish Chandra Ghose in 1862, the Hindu launched in 1878 by a group of young men led by Subramania Iyer and Kesari and Maratha started by Bal Gangadhar Tilak and his associates in 1881 were quite outspoken in the criticism of the government. Writing on the increasing animosity between the English and the Indians Amrita Bazar Patrika wrote in 1868 : "The English want to keep the Bengalis down, the Bengalis want to stand up. The English find that the Bengalis can no longer be cowed down by merely bullying or bribery. So they adopt sterner measures…"
When Dwaraknath Mishra, Judge of the Supreme Court and an avid reader of the Patrika told Sisir Kumar Ghose that he found the language used in the Patrika somewhat coarse, Ghose replied that the Patrika had been started to infuse a sense of patriotism in the people of the country. "They are now more dead than alive," he contended. "Our language has, therefore, to be loud and penetrating."
W.S. Blunt paid high tribute to the Hindu in 1884 by declaring that their editors "contrasted by no means unfavourably with men of their profession in London."

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