Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Writes Henry Cotton : "Lord Ripon was harassed and hampered by the bigotry and race feeling of his own fellow countrymen. He was paralysed by want of support".
Ultimately, Lord Ripon was compelled to settle for a watered-down version of the Ilbert Bill. The modification allowed a white person facing trial to have a bench of jury, half of which was composed of whites.
Surendranath Banerji in Bengal, Pherozeshah Mehta, Badruddin Tyabji and Kashinath Telang in Bombay organised their own campaign in support of the Ilbert Bill. But leaders in other parts of the country did not take any interest in the matter and the campaign fizzled out. A.C. Mazumdar, an eminent political leader noted : "The Ilbert Bill agitation thus went a great way towards impressing Indians, that in the political world, success did not depend so much upon men as on organised efforts and so paved the way to united and concerted action".
The European-led agitation against the Ilbert Bill also served as an eye-opener to westernised Indians who now realised that the whites would never accept them as equals even though they dressed and talked and behaved like them.
"The Anglo-Indian agitation against Lord Ripon's government, the protests which asserted that 'the only people who have any right to India are the British', the whole attitude of Englishmen in regard to Indian interests", concludes Henry Cotton, "have only succeeded in advancing the cause of Indian unity…."

       Go to   Previous Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.