Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Thousands of lawyers joined in the boycott of British courts. Among them were eminent lawyers like Chittaranjan Das, Motilal Nehru, his son, Jawaharlal Nehru, C. Rajagopalachari, Rajendra Prasad, Vallabhbhai Patel, Saiffuddin Kitchlew, Asaf Ali and T. Prakasam — all of whom gave up lucrative practices.
Volunteers went from house to house to collect clothes made from foreign cloth. The clothes were burnt in the presence of the people of the locality in huge bonfires.
As freedom in the true sense meant breaking "shackles of social bondage of every kind," a campaign was launched to persuade people to give up the practice of untouchability.
A temperance movement was formed to free people from the "demon of drink". Volunteers stood at the entrances of liquor shops especially those selling foreign liquor to discourage patronage.
In Bengal when the government banned Congress volunteers from selling khadi, Chittaranjan Das sent his son to sell khadi and court arrest. On the following day, his wife, Basanti Devi, accompanied by two other women went out to sell khadi. When the police took her into custody, thousands of people poured into the streets and courted arrest. Imprisonment became a badge of honour and the jails in the country could not accomodate the great number of prisoners.
"We must widen the prison gates," Gandhi had said, "and we must enter them as a bridegroom enters the bride's chamber. Freedom is to be wooed only inside prison walls and sometimes on the gallows, never in the council chambers, courts or school rooms."

Towards Swaraj

Lokmanya Tilak died in the early hours of 1st August 1920 and it was on that very day that Gandhi launched the Non-co-operation Movement. Tilak had declared "Swaraj is my birthright..." The mass participation in the non-co-operation movement showed that a great many of his countrymen shared his views and were prepared to make any sacrifice to claim their birthright.

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