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The Last Island

Tirichirapalli is the Kaveri's next port of call. According to legend, it was here that a three-headed demon, Trisiras, was killed. It was the capital of the Cholas for many years and the decisive Carnatic Wars between the English and the French were fought here. Trichy's famous Rock Fort has a temple to Ganesha at its summit. About 3 km above Trichy is the third and last island on the Kaveri's course: Srirangam or Antyaranga. The reclining idol of Sri Vishnu here is similar to the ones in Shivasamudram and Srirangapatna. Though the original temple was small, succeeding rulers added to it and now it is a vast complex, with a number of entrances and gopurams. The Hoysala rulers of Mysore bestowed a number of gifts and endowments on the Srirangam temple in the 13th century. In 1371, the armies of Vijayanagar liberated Srirangam from Muslim occupation. Its rulers restored the temple and showered generous grants of land and wealth on it. Inside the temple is a shrine to Ramanuja, the great Vaishnava philosopher who settled in Srirangam but later made Karnataka his home. At Srirangam, the Kaveri divides into two branches, encircles the island and rejoins further east.
But instead of merging fully, one branch has split away, carving a new path for itself northwards. This is the Coleroon or Kollidam. One of the great Chola rulers, Karikalan, built the Grand Anicut across the Coleroon about 1600 years ago, to divert its waters for irrigation. Called Kalanai by the Tamils, the dam is a marvel of engineering going by the primitive technology available then. The Lower Anicut was built by Arthur Cotton in 1836 and a second dam was added later.


Last updated on :11/3/2003

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Dimdima is the Sanskrit word for ‘drumbeat’. In olden days, victory in battle was heralded by the beat of drums or any important news to be conveyed to the people used to be accompanied with drumbeats.

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Dimdima.com, the Children's Website of Bharatiya Vidya Bhavan launched in 2000 and came out with a Printed version of Dimdima Magazine in 2004. At present the Printed Version have more than 35,000 subscribers from India and Abroad.

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