Digital Dimdima
-By Jayanthi Mahalingam
Down to the sea
The Narmada in Gujarat
A Hill With A View
The Monuments Of Mandu
An Ancient City
An Island In The River
Beyond Hoshangabad
Steeped In Legends
Narmadey Har
The Cult of Thuggee
The Splendour of Marble Rocks
Original Inhabitants
The World Of Verrier Elwin
Tribal Queen
The Jewel Of Kanha
The Narmada In Mythology

 

The Monuments Of Mandu

The hill-fort of Mandu is separated from the main plateau of Malwa by Kakra Khoh, a deep ravine. You can enter the fort city through any one of its arched gates : Alamgir Gate, Bhangi Gate, Karnani Gate and the Gada Gate.
Many of the monuments Mandu was once famous for, are now in a state of ruin. The Nahar Jharokha or the Tiger Balcony once served as the place for kings to address their subjects. Emperor Jahangir conferred the title of Shah Jahan or king of the universe upon his son Prince Khurram here. In the vicinity of the balcony is the Champa Baori, a well whose sweet water has the fragrance of the champa flower.
Mandu has a few monuments that have withstood the test of time. One such monument is Dilawar Khanís Mosque, which is the earliest Indo-Islamic structure in the region. It was built by Dilawar Khan, the founder of the Ghuri dynasty.
The Hindola Mahal and the Jahaz Mahal in Manduís royal enclave, are architectural wonders. Both palaces were built by Sultan Ghiyas-ud-din Khilji. The Hindola Mahal or the Swinging Palace got its name because of its peculiarly sloping side walls. The Jahaz Mahal, as its name suggests, is a palace that gives the impression of an anchored ship. Close to the market place is the tomb of Hoshang Shah, son of Dilawar Khan. It is Indiaís first marble edifice. Shah Jahan is believed to have sent his architects to Mandu to study this tomb before designing the Taj Mahal.
The most romantic place in Mandu, is the Roopmati Pavilion, the palace Sultan Baz Bahadur (the regionís last Pathan ruler) built for his lovely Hindu consort, Roopmati. It stands on top of a hill. The lovers met with a tragic end. When Baz Bahadur was defeated by the Mughal army, he left Roopmati behind. The hapless lady consumed poison, preferring death to separation. Roopmati was buried by the side of Baz Bahadur in a tomb in Sarangpur.
Roopmatiís pavilion overlooks Baz Bahadurís palace and the gently flowing Narmada, in the Nimar plains far below. It was from this pavillion that Roopmati used to offer her prayers to the sacred Narmada.
Ruins of rock-cut Buddhist shrines and monastries dating back to the 4th and 5th centuries AD nestle in the southern slopes of the Vindhyas, in the Narmada valley. They are called Bagha Gompha because they became a tigersí haunt after the monks left. The caves were rediscovered only two centuries ago. Gross neglect have played havoc to the wall paintings, that once compared only with the paintings at Ajanta and Ellora.


Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.