Digital Dimdima
-By Diana Tijoriwalla
Indians in NZ
The Howick Historical Village
School Levels
The Treaty of Waitangi.
Maori Cooking
Anzac Day 25th April
Auckland Regional Parks
Tongariro National Park
The Buried Village (Rotorua)
Aucklandís Islands
Paradise Valley Springs (Rotorua)
MOTAT
The Polynesian Spa
Rules for Teachers
Daffodil Day
The Waitakere Ranges
Western Springs Tramway
Auckland Museum
New Zealand's Pride
The Tuatara
Maungakiekie
Secondary Schools
Sir Edmund Hillary
Halloween
Auckland Zoo

Go to page: 1  2 
Aucklandís Islands

Rangitoto Island:
This is the largest & the youngest of Aucklandís volcanoes. It is now extinct. The island is now managed by the Department of Conservation. Rangitoto became a public reserve in 1890. During the 1920s & 30s, prisoners built roads, trails & stone walls on the island. During the World War II, extensive defence installations were placed on the site. You can indulge in activities like swimming, fishing, walking, bird watching, nature study, walking up to the summit & many more things. Lava caves near the centre of the island are worth seeing. Although covered in basaltic lava, Rangitoto has the largest remaining of Pohutukawa forest in New Zealand. From downtown Auckland, you get ferries to reach to this place.
Motutapu Island:
It is about 8km north-east of Auckland. Joined to Rangitoto Island by a causeway, it is much older & different, geologically & botanically. There are many archaeological sites from early Maori occupation to recent European history. You can reach this place in a ferry.
Browns Island:
Browns Island or Motukorea is a small dot lying off Aucklandís eastern suburbs. Historic Maori pa sites, gardens & settlements cover the island. In 1840, Willam Brown bought it & established a pig farm with Dr John Logan Campbell. In 1956 Auckland businessman Sir Ernest Davis gave the island to the city. Motukorea is a popular picnic destination, but there are no visitor facilities on the island. No ferry services are available, but one can reach there by other means (small boats, kayak, etc).
Motuihe Island:
Motuihe is 16km from downtown Auckland & is a recreation reserve known for its sheltered sandy beaches, clear waters & excellent anchorages. Motuihe was extensively settled by Maori & then farmed by Europeans for over a century, the site of Aucklandís quarantine station for 50 yrs, a prisoner of war camp during the World War I & a naval training base. You can reach there by a ferry or a private boat.
Waiheke Island:
It lies around 17km off Auckland. Around 8000 people live on this island. This island has been home to various iwi for about a thousand yrs & there are more than 50 pa sites on the island. The name Waiheke means Ďcascading watersí. You can reach there by a ferry.
Tiritiri Matangi Island:
This is an open pests-free sanctuary for rare & endangered plant & animal species. You cannot bring pests, seeds or pets onto the island. The Kawerau-A-Maki tribe built the Pa Tiritiri Matangi which was destroyed during inter-tribal conflicts. In 1971, Tiritiri became a part of the Hauraki Gulf Maritime Park. Its 20m high lighthouse has guided ships into the Hauraki Gulf since 1865. Here you can see New Zealandís rarest wildlife. You can take a ferry from downtown Auckland.
Kawau Island:
The Maori people lived here until 1840 & copper was mined here in the mid 19th cent. Governor Sir George Grey bought Kawau in 1862 & in 1977 it became a part of the Hauraki Gulf Maritime Park & is open to the public. You can get there from downtown Auckland.

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.