Digital Dimdima
Andhra Pradesh
Arunachal Pradesh
Assam
Bihar
Chhattisgarh
Goa
Gujarat
Haryana
Himachal Pradesh
Jammu & Kashmir
Jharkhand
Karnataka
Kerala
Madhya Pradesh
Maharashtra
Manipur
Meghalaya
Mizoram
Nagaland
Orissa
Punjab
Rajasthan
Sikkim
Tamil Nadu
Tripura
Uttar Pradesh
Uttaranchal
West Bengal

 

Gujarat

Some historians say they were foreigners who came with the Central Asian invaders called Huns; others say they were a hill tribe of Rajasthan that grew in power after the Huns had destroyed or dispersed the ruling class. Whatever be their origin the Gurjars rose to prominence in the sixth century A.D. They took advantage of the downfall of the once mighty Gupta empire to establish principalities in Punjab, Marwar and Broach and by the eight century the Gurjara - Pratiharas as they are referred to were an important power in the region. By the end of the 9th century they were in decline and were succeeded by the Solankis, also known as the Chalukyas. This was Gujarat's golden age and the period when its borders reached their greatest extent.
Gujarat's position on the western coast facilitated trade with the Arabs and others and was one of the factors that contributed to its prosperity down the ages. But its wealth drew to it invaders like Mahmud of Ghazni who sacked Somnath in 1025 A.D. Others followed him and in 1297 Gujarat passed into the hands of Sultan Alauddin Khilji of Delhi. A long period of Muslim rule followed. Ahmad Shah, the first independent ruler of Gujarat founded Ahmedabad in 1411.
The Mughal emperor Akbar captured Gujarat in the 1570's. Almost 200 years later in the mid-1700's it was overrun by the Marathas.
Then came the British. It was in Surat in 1612 that the British first set up their base and later went on to establish an empire in the country.
The present-day boundaries of Gujarat were drawn in 1960 when Gujarati-speaking areas of the vast Bombay state were separated from it and together with the former princely states of Saurashtra were constituted into a new state.
Gujarat is a land steeped in tradition, where festivals abound.
Ahmedabad hosts an international kite festival on Makar Sankranti on 14 January, each year.
A three-day extravaganza takes place towards the end of August every year at Tarnetar, 176 km from Ahmedabad. According to tradition, it was here that the brave Arjuna won the hand of the fair Draupadi.
The most-eagerly awaited festival is Navratri ó nine nights of festivity when the entire state resounds with the beat of the dhol, cymbals, flute and the thrilling wail of the shehnai. Every street and village square comes alive with men and women, young and old, dancing the raas garba from late night to the wee hours of the morning.
Gujaratís famous places include the 863 Jain temples of Palitana, where no one, not even the priests are allowed to spend the night; the 600-metre high Mount Girnar, where one can see a massive rock, on which the great emperor, Ashoka engraved 14 edicts in the Pali script in around 250 B.C.; Porbandar, the birthplace of Mahatma Gandhi, and the excavated sites of Lothal and Dholavira, where the ancient civilisations of Mohenjodaro and Harappa flourished.
Gujarat is also home to endangered animal species like the Asiatic lion, the wild ass and the blackbuck.


Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.