Digital Dimdima
Andhra Pradesh
Arunachal Pradesh
Assam
Bihar
Chhattisgarh
Goa
Gujarat
Haryana
Himachal Pradesh
Jammu & Kashmir
Jharkhand
Karnataka
Kerala
Madhya Pradesh
Maharashtra
Manipur
Meghalaya
Mizoram
Nagaland
Orissa
Punjab
Rajasthan
Sikkim
Tamil Nadu
Tripura
Uttar Pradesh
Uttaranchal
West Bengal

 

Goa

Around 1488, Goa was captured by the Adil Shahis of Bijapur.
This was the time when the Portuguese were searching for a base to gain control of the spice route from the east. The sea route to India was established by Vasco da Gama in 1498. In 1510, the Portuguese, under the command of Afonso de Albuquerque, conquered Goa, becoming the first Europeans to establish a territorial foothold in India, and also, the last to leave (in 1961).
During the Portuguese rule, Goa became an important centre for Catholic Christian missionaries and it was made an archbishopric with authority all over India, Mozambique and Japan.
Portuguese rule, however, was so oppressive and exploitative that during the 450 years of their rule, over 40 armed revolts took place.The first major attempt to drive the Portuguese out of Goa is said to have been made by Mateus de Castro, the first Goan bishop of the Roman Church.
In 1928, Tristao Braganza Cunha, known as the father of the nationalist movement in Goa, along with leaders like Purushottam Kakodkar, Laxmi Kant Bhembre, Divakar Kakodkar and Dayanand Bandodkar, formed the Goa Congress Committee to work for Goa’s freedom and integration with India.
On 18th June, 1946, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia gave the call for civil disobedience at Margao. Despite prohibitory orders given by the Portuguese governor, thousands of people responded to his call. Goans to this day celebrate 18th June as Goa Revolutionary Day.
The liberation movement became stronger after Indian independence in 1947. The Portuguese refused a peaceful transfer of power to the Indian Union. Instead they resorted to repression and sent nationalist leaders into exile. On 17th December 1961, Indian troops moved into Goa and in an almost bloodless coup, succeeded in liberating Goa and the two other Portuguese territories of Daman and Diu as well.
Goa was incorporated into the Indian Union as a Union Territory first. It became the 25th state of the Indian Union on 30th May, 1987.

Goa's beaches, medieval churches and temples and its unique Indo-Portuguese ambience draws tourists in their thousands from the rest of India and abroad. Tourism in fact is one of Goa's major industries.
Rice is the staple food of all Goans and fish is relished by most. But Goa's speciality is cashew which like many other fruits was introduced by the Portuguese.
Churches
About 37 per cent of the population is Christian so there are churches and crosses at roadsides, everywhere. The state's most famous church is the Basilica of Bom Jesus, in Old Goa. It houses the miraculously preserved body of St. Francis Xavier, patron saint of Goa.
The most important temple and perhaps the most beautiful, is the Manguesh Temple in Mangueshi, in Ponda. Most of its buildings are eighteenth century including a seven-storeyed deepmal, a tower designed to be decorated with lamps on festive occasions. Such towers are a characteristic feature of Goan temples.
The Shantadurga Temple in Quepem is visited by both Hindu and Christian devotees. The image of the goddess is made of five metals and is one foot in height. She holds a trishul and a shield in her hands and is said to appear to her devotees in a dream whenever she wants anything to be done.
Forts
Aguada fort which contains as many as 79 guns is the best preserved of all the Portuguese forts along the coast of Goa. It is now used as a prison.
Towards the end of February there is a 3-day carnival. The festivities include parades, masquerades and dancing in the street.


Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.