Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

The first schools for girls had been started at the beginning of the 19th century by Christian missionaries. By the middle of the century, progressive-minded Indians in all parts of the country but especially in Bengal, began to advocate education for women.
In Maharashtra, Jyotirao Phule founded the first school for women in Pune. Predictably there was opposition to the move to open up education for girls. When Ananta Shastri of Maharashtra began to teach Sanskrit to his wife Laxmibai, the villagers boycotted the couple. The couple had to build a house in the forest where their daughter Ramabai was born in 1858.
Pandita Ramabai grew up to become a champion of women's education. She attended the 1889 Congress in Mumbai, along with 9 other ladies.
The women delegates were not allowed to speak or vote on resolutions at this session. However, in the 1890 session, a woman delegate was allowed to speak and she is reported to have thanked the President for granting her the privilege.
It took another 40 years for women in Bengal to shed the purdah. A group of Brahmo women took the lead by walking through the streets of Calcutta with their faces uncovered and singing loudly.
One of the first women activists was Sarala Debi Ghoshal, a niece of poet Rabindranath Tagore. After graduation, at the age of 23, Sarala Debi left home in 1894 and took up a job as Asst. Superintendent at a girl's school in distant Mysore. She chose to leave her home because she 'wanted to flee the cage or prison of home, and establish her right to an independent livelihood like men.' On her return to Calcutta she became the editor of Bharati, a monthly journal. In 1904, Sarala Debi trained a group to sing Bande Mataram at the Congress session held in Calcutta. It was Sarala Debi who initiated the move to use the words Bande Mataram as a national call, thus preparing the ground for women to participate in the struggle for freedom.

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