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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

At the village of Nanagaum, Phadke told a gathering of villagers: "...we are small, and in the same way as parents take care of their children when cough, fever or sickness come, if you will take care of us, the English having been destroyed by our hands, you will have comfort but if you will not rear and take care of us out of fear of the Englishmen, one day they will even dig up your children."
The villagers were impressed with the quiet determination of the man and said: "Come here whenever you will, you may remain in these forests without fear."
Phadke, however, was soon disenchanted with the men he had gathered round him. They were interested only in the loot and did not share his patriotic zeal. Disgusted with their conduct, Phadke left them and headed for the Shri Shaila Mallikarjun shrine in the south. Overcome by a sense of failure Phadke even thought of ending his life. In his diary he wrote: "I have only seven days to live, so I think. Therefore I bow before the feet of all you my brethren, inhabitants of India, and give up my life for you and will remain pleading for you in the just court of God...I pray to God that he may take my life as a sacrifice for your welfare, and of you all I take farewell."
However, a priest at the shrine nursed him back to health. With a new- found vigour Phadke set out to raise an army and recruited 900 men including 500 Rohillas. But before he could put his plans into action, Major Daniel was on to his trail and Phadke had to flee. He was pursued day and night by Major Daniel and Abdul Haque, Police Commissioner to the Nizam of Hyderabad. At last they found him exhausted and asleep in a temple in a village. Phadke was charged under sections 121A, 122 and 124A for waging war against the Queen and for exciting feelings of disaffection against the Government. He was sentenced to transportation for life. He was fettered and placed in solitary confinement in Aden jail. He managed to escape one night by pulling a door off its hinges and taking off his fetters with a hinge. However, he was recaptured the next day.
What surprised the government was the overwhelming sympathy people had for Phadke. On his arrest Deccan Star wrote: "In the eyes of his countrymen, Vasudev Balwant Phadke did not commit any wrong."
The saga of Phadke was sung in distant Bengal years later. His life and his sufferings fired the imagination of the young revolutionaries there and they took up where he left off.

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