Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Gandhiji's decision to call off the non-cooperation movement came as a great disappointment to the people. "No one could understand," wrote Subhas Chandra Bose, "why the Mahatma should have used the isolated incident at Chauri Chaura for strangling the movement all over the country. To sound the order of retreat just when public enthusiasm was reaching the boiling point was nothing short of a national calamity." Gandhiji had informed the Viceroy before launching the civil disobedience campaign so when he called it off the British were jubilant.
"Let the opponent glory in our humiliation or so called defeat", said Gandhiji with his characteristic calmness. "It is better to be charged with cowardice and weakness than to be guilty of denial of our oath and to sin against God. It is a million times better to appear untrue before the world than to be untrue to ourselves". Explaining Gandhiji's strange behaviour his biographer Louis Fischer wrote: "Gandhijis criteria were not the usual criteria of politics. His leadership did not depend on victories. He did not have to save face. He could admit blunders Himalayan or less, because he did not claim infallibility or superiority."
Viceroy Reading thought that Gandhi was finished as a politician. Gandhi, he wrote, "had pretty well run himself into the last ditch as a politician..."And the Viceroy chose that moment to strike. Gandhi was arrested on the charge of sedition.
Gandhiji told judge Bromfield. "I do not ask for mercy... I am here, therefore to invite and cheerfully submit to the highest penalty that can be inflicted upon me for what in law is a deliberate crime and what appears to me to be the highest duty of a citizen... In my opinion, non co-operation with evil is as much a duty as is co-operation with good."
The judge bowed to Gandhiji and before sentencing him to six years imprisonment said: "...It would be impossible to ignore the fact that, in the eyes of millions of your countrymen, you are a great patriot and a great leader. Even those who differ from you in politics look upon you as a man of high ideals…"
Writing in 'Young India' Gandhiji had said: "Rivers of blood shed by the Government cannot frighten me, but I should be deeply pained even if the people did so much as abuse the government for my sake or in my name. It would be disgracing me if the people lost their equilibrium on my arrest."
His countrymen fulfilled his expectations. There was no disorder. People waited patiently for the return of the Mahatma now languishing in jail.

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