Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

The Hindu-Muslim equation underwent a qualitative change due to three factors: English education, employment in government services and the British policy of Divide and Rule.
The new system of administration introduced by the British was linked to English education which the Hindus took to and to which Muslims remained indifferent.
Between the founding of Hindu College in Calcutta in 1817 and Aligarh Muslim University, there was a gap of about sixty years. During this period the government was also wary of giving jobs to Muslims whom it held responsible for the events of 1857. Thus education and employment created a gulf between the two communities. As more and more people competed for government jobs, Hindus and Muslims could not but become aware of their separate identities and by the beginning of the 20th century, leaders of both communities began to take steps to safeguard the interests of their own people.
So it was that Sir Syed Ahmed Khan urged his people to keep off agitational politics that could make the administration suspect their loyalty. This gave the government a chance to play one community against the other. Lord Curzon, for instance, went out of his way to point out the advantages Muslims would have with the formation of the new state of East Bengal and Assam. "The province so created", declared the Viceroy in a speech in Dacca, "…would invest the Mohammedans in Eastern Bengal with a unity which they have not enjoyed since the days of the old Musalman Viceroys and Kings…"
Fuller who took over as the Lieutenant-Governor of the newly created East Bengal said with reference to the two sections of the population, Muslims and Hindus, that they were like his two queens, the first being the suo the favoured and the second the duo the neglected.
In 1906, a section of the Muslim community formed the Muslim League to safeguard what the organisers called the Muslim interest. While the Indian National Congress claimed to represent the people of India — Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs and all — the Muslim League maintained that the league alone represented Muslim interests. While a few organizations claiming to represent the Hindus or Sikhs did come into existence none of them reached the level of importance of the Muslim League.
Thus, even as India was emerging as a nation at the beginning of this century, forces of disintegration were forming at the same time.

       Go to   Previous Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.