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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

The Rani of Jhansi put up a heroic resistance. An eyewitness account, describing the battle for Jhansi on 22 March 1858 records : "There, guns never ceased firing except at night. Even women were seen working at the batteries and distributing ammunition."
On 29 March the guns of Jhansi fell silent. When the British troops marched into the fort they found that the Rani had escaped.
In a move that took the British by surprise, the Rani joined forces with Tatya and took Gwalior on June 1.
The seizure of Gwalior by the Rani created a sensation throughout India. The British mounted a spirited counter-attack. The brave Rani rode out of the fort and engaged the enemy on the outskirts of Gwalior. Finally the Rani fell, struck by a bullet. Sir Hugh Rose saluting the Rani described her as the best and the bravest of the rebel leaders.
Tatya escaped again and thereafter, until his capture through betrayal in April 1859 harassed the British with hit-and-run raids. The great revolt which began with Mangal Pande firing the first shot on March 29, 1857 ended with the hanging of Tatya Tope on April 15, 1859.

What Happened to Nana?
           Several prominent leaders of the 1857 revolt including Begum Hazrat Mahal and Nana Saheb escaped to Nepal. Many died while crossing over to Nepal. From his correspondence with the British it is clear that Nana Saheb was most anxious to return to India. But Nana failed to get an assurance that he would not have to face trial. Did Nana come back to India in disguise? There were several reports from people who claimed to have seen him at one place or the other. To this day nobody knows whether Nana Saheb died in India or in Nepal.
Rana Beni Madho of Shankarpur in Awadh was another rebel leader who successfully eluded the British. Brigadier Eveleigh reported : "We have certain intelligence, that he is at all points of the compass at exactly the same hour of the same day and we do not have thirty-one columns to spare to verify these reports." British soldiers pursuing him composed this song:

     Where have you been all day
     Beni Madho, O Beni Madho!
    Why are you so scared of British pluck
    Beni Madho, O Beni Madho!
    Because to beat you is not my luck
    Beni Madho, O Beni Madho!

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