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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

They also exploited the rivalry and in-fighting among the Indian rulers to their advantage. With the subjugation of India, the English East India Company achieved monopoly of trade and control over the financial resources in India. In the process, by the beginning of the 19th century, the people of the country had been reduced to utter poverty. While they found it difficult to pay an eight anna increase in the salt tax, the Company Sircar felt it could not afford to forgo it. Apparently the Company Sircar agreed with the Indian saying that drops of water coming together make an ocean.

Early Englishmen in India

in India it is said that the first Englishman to set foot in India was Sighelm. According to an Anglo-Saxon chronicle, King Alfred the Great sent Sighelm on a pilgrimage to India.
The discovery of the sea-route to India fired the imagination of poets. In his Paradise Lost, John Milton refers to "Agra and Lahore of Great Mughal".
Christopher Marlowe, the playwright makes Faustus say: "Shall I make spirits fetch me what I please… I'll have them fly to India for gold, Ransack the ocean for orient pearl, And search all corners of the new-found world For pleasant fruits and princely delicates.
The first expedition to India organized by London merchants in 1583 reached North Africa by sea and from Tripoli followed the overland route to reach India.
In December 1600, Queen Elizabeth I granted a charter to the "Governor and Company of merchants of London trading into the East Indies".
In 1608 Captain William Hawkins of the English East India Company landed in Surat. He obtained the emperor's permission to open an English East India Company factory in Surat.
Sir Thomas Roe describes his meeting at Ajmer with the Mughal Emperor Jahangir : "I made him reverence and he bowed his body… I demanded a chair, but was answered no man ever sat in that place, but I was desired as a courtesy to ease myself against a pillar, covered with silver that held up his canopy!"

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