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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Indians Not Allowed

In cities and towns, Indians dressed in European attire were treated with greater respect by government officials. In the Patna Railway station incident, for instance, the aggrieved citizens told Blunt that had they been in western dress, they would perhaps not have been treated with such contempt.
While Indians in western attire were not required to take off their footwear while entering a government office to meet officials, Indians in native attire had to take off theirs.
There were many clubs meant exclusively for Europeans. English-educated Indians, some of whom were members of the best clubs in London could not meet their English friends at snobbish clubs like Bombay's Yacht Club because Indians were not allowed entry. These Indians who had interacted with Englishmen in England on equal terms resented being treated like second class citizens in their own country. The humiliation they faced on the social front turned many of them against the British.

Body Blows

The cases of assault on Indians by Europeans were ever on the increase. In 1900 more than 200 cases were reported, out of which more than 75 were brutal attacks on punkha coolies by European soldiers.
The Barahanagar Patrika Samachar reports the case of Inspector Smith of Dumdum Police Station who tore off the beard of a cart-puller for refusing him the use of his cart which had already been hired by an Indian.
Lord Curzon noted with concern that "the number of cases of violent collision between Europeans and natives was increasing with a rapidity that appeared to me to be dangerous and menacing… I found also that… inclination of the Europeans…was in favour of glossing over and palliating rather than of exposing and punishing these crimes."
He wrote : "I know that as long as Europeans…rule… Indians, incidents of…violence will occur and that the white man will tend to side with the white skin against the dark, …it is the duty of statesmanship to arrest these dangerous symptoms and to prevent them from attaining dimensions that might even threaten the existence of our rule in the future."

A Daniel Come to Judgement

Some members of the judiciary tried to rise above racial prejudices while dispensing justice. Sessions Judge Pennel for example, refused to take note of the colour of the guilty when he awarded punishment.
In 1899, a constable called Narsingh was severely beaten up by Corbett, the Police Superintendent of Chhapra district in Bengal. Narsingh's crime was that he refused to do forced labour for the district engineer, a friend of the Police Superintendent. Narsingh refused to leave the service despite being asked by Corbett to do so. Narsingh was prosecuted and the magistrate, under pressure from above, sentenced Narsingh to two months' imprisonment.
When Narsingh preferred an appeal before the district and sessions judge, Pennel, the learned judge admitted the appeal with these observations:
"Assaults by Europeans upon natives are unfortunately not uncommon. They are not likely to cease until the disappearance of real or supposed racial superiority."
The judgement created a commotion among officials and Pennel was transferred to Noakhali by telegram.
Pennel once remarked : "In this country the only people who will come forward to give evidence against officers are those who do not mind their houses being burnt, their shops looted, their relations turned out of government employment, themselves and members of their families dragged up on false charges and sent to jail."
In another case of murder, Pennel held the accused guilty and sentenced him to death. In this connection Pennel had the Police Superintendent, Raily arrested because he had tried to secure the release of the murderer by giving false evidence.
While people hailed Pennel's judgement calling him Dharmavatar, a Daniel, the government took a serious view of the arrest of the police superintendent.
The High Court suspended Pennel and telegraphically ordered the release of Raily on bail. When Pennel left for Calcutta, a 15,000-strong crowd silently accompanied him from his residence to the railway station. To the people of Bengal, Judge Pennel was a hero.

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