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India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
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A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
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A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
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Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Gopal Krishna Gokhale who took over as the 'Leader of the Opposition' when Mehta decided not to contest in 1902, became famous for his incisive budget speeches.
In 1902, reacting to the surplus budget presented by Edward Law, Gokhale held that the surplus shown in times of famine and suffering constituted 'a wrong to the community'. Quoting at length from the government's own facts and figures, Gokhale showed how Indian interests were subordinated to foreign interests and linked poverty of the people to British rule. Overnight the humble teacher from Pune who was only 36 years at that time, became the darling of the nation. The Amrita Bazar Patrika wrote: "We had ever entertained the ambition of seeing some Indian member openly and fearlessly criticizing the Financial Statement of the Government. But this ambition was never satisfied. When members had ability, they had not the requisite courage. When they had the requisite courage, they had not the ability. For the first time in the annals of British Rule in India, a native of India has not only succeeded in exposing the fallacies which underlie these government statements, but has ventured to do it in an uncompromising manner."
The government feared Gokhale's criticism so much that when a new revenue member had to be appointed in 1910, Viceroy Minto insisted that the person appointed should be one who could stand up to Gokhale.
Paying handsome compliments to Gokhale, Lord Curzon observed:
"In fact he was the Leader of the Opposition and in that capacity I had often to suffer from the weight of Mr. Gokhale's blows... I have never met a man of any nationality more gifted with Parliamentary capacities. Mr. Gokhale would have obtained a position of distinction in any Parliament in the world, even in the British House of Commons. Widely as we differed, I never failed to recognize either his ability or character."
Other eminent Indian members of councils included Surendranath Banerji, Kali Charan Banerji, Anand Mohan Bose, W.C. Banerji and others from Bengal; Diwan Ananda Charlu, C. Sankaran Nair and Vijayaraghavachariar from the South; Madan Mohan Malaviya, Ayodhyanath and Bishambhar Nath from the United Provinces, and Tilak, R.M. Sayani, Chimanlal Setalvad, N.G. Chandravarkar and others from Maharashtra.
These outstanding parliamentarians proved beyond doubt that Indians had the ability to shoulder the responsibility of conducting their own affairs.

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