Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Towards the end of the 19th century, the political organizations most active were the British Indian Association in Calcutta, the Bombay Presidency Association, Sarvajanik Sabha in Pune and Mahajan Sabha in Madras. Though these organisations were in touch with each other, they lacked the ability to work jointly for the national or public good.
Ganesh Vasudev Joshi of Sarvajanik Sabha, Pune, dreamt of an All-India organisation. So did Surendranath Banerji who convened the National Conference in Calcutta in 1883. In Madras, a group of eminent public figures including Annie Besant and Raghunatha Rao initiated a move to establish an All-India organization. All these leaders readily responded when A.O. Hume convened the Indian National Congress to meet in Mumbai in the last week of December 1885.
The Congress, which elected Womesh Chandra Bannerjee as its president and A.O. Hume as the secretary, caught the imagination of the people. Other political organisations of the day either merged with the Congress or participated in its programmes even while retaining their regional identity.
The INC aimed to promote fellow-feeling and friendship between people working for the common good all over the country and to nurture and develop feelings of national unity.
Though Englishmen like A.O. Hume were associated with the founding of the Congress, the British reaction was definitely hostile. The London Times described the Congress as a party of lawyers, school masters and newspaper editors. "That they can talk and that they can write, we are in no doubt at all," wrote the leading daily from London in one of its editorials. "But that they can govern wisely, or that they can enforce submission to their rule, wise or unwise, we are not equally sure." The editorial concluded with a warning to the newly formed Congress: "…It was by force that India was won, and it is by force that India must be governed....If we were to withdraw, it would be in favour not of the most fluent tongue or of the strongest arm but the sharpest sword."
The battle lines were being drawn!

       Go to   Previous Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.