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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Ghadar which was published in Urdu, Hindi, Gurmukhi and English, declared:
"What is our name? Mutiny. What is our work? Mutiny. Where will mutiny break out? In India. The time will come when rifles and blood will take the place of pen and ink."
Lala Hardayal was the moving spirit behind the Ghadar movement in America. Later Ram Chandra carried on the work.
The Ghadar party strived to mould public opinion in America in favour of Indian independence. In 1915 in Philadelphia, 10,000 American citizens joined the Ghadar parade to protest against British atrocities in India. Gadar reported : "Philadelphia, the home of Benjamin Franklin knows full well what it is for a nation to struggle for recognition of foreign powers."
Indian revolutionaries received ready support from the German government when the First World War broke out in 1914. It suited German interests to promote revolutionary activity in India. Nothing would have pleased the Germans more than an armed rebellion in India with Indian soldiers rising in mutiny against their English masters.
An Indo-German mission led by Raja Mahendra Pratap arrived in Afghanistan soon after the war broke out. The raja succeeded in winning Afghan support and set up a provisional government of India, in Kabul in December, 1915.
The government in India was perturbed by the activities of the revolutionaries and sometimes reacted with panic.
When the Japanese vessel, Komagata Maru, carrying a large number of Punjabis docked at Budge Budge near Hooghly on 29 September 1914, the government suspected some of the passengers to be Ghadar sympathisers. The passengers were in fact, Sikhs who had wanted to migrate to Canada. The Canadian authorities had refused them entry and sent the ship back.
When the ship arrived at Budge Budge harbour, the authorities would not allow the passengers to disembark and proceed to Calcutta where they could have found employment. Instead they were ordered to board a train that was to take them to the Punjab. When the Sikhs attempted to visit a Gurdwara at Hooghly they were fired upon by the police and army units. Eighteen Sikhs were killed and twenty-five injured.
This senseless slaughter of innocents turned the people of the Punjab against the British. The Punjab and the Northwest provinces became a hotbed of revolutionary activity.

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