Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

While Dutt diagnosed the ills that plagued the Indian economy under British rule, it was left to Mahadev Govind Ranade to prescribe the antidote. Ranade did not want India to be reduced to the status of a supplier of food grains and raw materials to Britain and at the same time provide a market for British goods. Ranade wanted India to manufacture.
Ganesh Vasudev Joshi gave concrete shape to Ranade's plans when he established the first Swadeshi trading store in Poona in 1873. Thirty years later Swadeshi was used as a powerful weapon of protest against the British in Bengal.

Romesh Chunder Dutt

Romesh Chunder Dutt, whose painstaking research showed how India had been drained of her resources under British rule, wrote the Economic History of India in two volumes, covering the period from 1757 to 1900.
Dutt, one of the first Indians to enter the Indian Civil Service, used his experience as an administrator to marshal facts and figures to depict the economic conditions of the people of India under British rule.
Dutt's first love was literature. He wrote both in Bengali and English. Some of his works include historical and social novels in Bengali, a translation of the Rigveda into Bengali, an English translation of the Ramayana and the Mahabharata and a history of ancient Indian civilization.
Dutt presided over the session of the Indian National Congress in 1899 at Lucknow. After his retirement in 1896 he settled down in London and worked with Dadabhai Naoroji, W.C. Bonnerjea and Gopal Krishna Gokhale, to draw attention to the economic exploitation of India. His contemporaries looked upon Dutt's Economic History of India as part of the political campaign to secure a better deal for India.
D.R. Gadgil considers this work by Dutt as "almost the first history of a colonial regime written from the point of view of the subject of a colonial empire." Gadgil also notes that "Dutt anticipated a number of the features incorporated later in discussions of economics of colonialism, and by implication, some features also connected with the economics of the growth of under- developed economies."
Dutt wrote in a simple but elegant style. Economic History of India, written at the beginning of this century is eminently readable even today, in the closing years of the century.

       Go to   Previous Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.