Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Reminiscent of 1857, students of the Benaras Hindu University raised the slogan Angrez bhag gaya 'the English have fled'. They hijacked trains and draped them in the tricolour.
In the first week after the Quit India resolution was passed, 250 railway stations were damaged and over 500 post offices and 150 police stations were attacked. Train services were disrupted for many weeks in Bihar and Eastern U.P.
The government hit back with a vengeance. In just one week, soldiers fired on unarmed crowds in different parts of the country on 538 occasions. This included machine-gun firing by low-flying aircraft. The government once again resorted to whipping and burning of entire villages as punishmenr. By the end of 1942, those arrested crossed the 60,000 mark.
When the government gagged the press, the freedom fighters set up the underground Congress radio which they operated from different locations in Bombay to evade detection. This radio which was manned by among others, Usha Mehta, continued to keep the country informed of the Quit India agitation and was finally confiscated by the police in November 1942.
Defying the brutal strength of the government, people set up parallel governments in different parts of the country. The people's government, Jatiya Sarkar set up in Tamluk in the Midnapur district of Bengal and which lasted till September 1944, undertook cyclone relief work, gave grants to schools, set up courts and distributed grains to the needy. The Prati Sarkar (parallel government) set up by Nana Patil and others in Satara, Western Maharashtra continued to function till 1945. The Prati Sarkar enforced prohibition, abolished untouchability and rural education was promoted.
Peasants, workers, students and women took active part in the movement. Though the Muslim League did not participate in the Quit India Movement, significantly this period was free from communal clashes. Even government officials, zamindars and Indian industrialists gave covert support.
Though Gandhiji did not approve of the methods adopted by the Quit India agitators, he held the government responsible maintaining that it was its repressive measures which had invited such a violent backlash.
Though the government succeeded to a large extent in suppressing the movement, the Quit India movement had once and for all liberated the people from the fear of British authority. Independence or Poorna Swaraj was no longer negotiable. Now the people of the country would be satisfied with nothing less than independence.

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