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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Reacting to the British stand that Indians should not grumble about economic drain for they enjoyed security of life and property under their rule as never before, Dadabhai Naoroji retorted,
"There is an Indian saying: 'Strike on the back, but don't strike on the belly.' Under the native despot the people keep and enjoy what they produce, though at times they suffer violence on the back. Under the British despot the man is at peace, there is no violence; his substance is drained away, unseen, peaceably and subtly – he starves in peace, and peaceably perishes in peace, with law and order!"

'Home Charges'

Besides India, Britain had several other colonies like Canada and Sri Lanka. In each of these colonies, administrative expenses incurred in England were borne by England. Only India was made to pay for administrative expenses incurred in England including the wages paid to the charwoman who kept rooms in India House clean. These expenses were called 'Home Charges.'
Whenever Company government failed to remit 'Home Charges,' the arrears were considered as Debt. This was how the so-called ‘India Debt’ originated. The debt swelled when England charged to ‘India Debt’ huge expenses the Company incurred during its wars against Haider Ali and Tipu Sultan of Mysore, the Marathas and lastly the Sikhs. This meant that India was made to pay for her own conquest by the British.
In 1834 the Company was asked to stop its trading activities in India. "However it was provided that the dividends on their stock should continue to be paid out of taxes imposed on the Indian people."
Expenses incurred in putting down the Great Revolt, which many Englishmen like John Bright thought should be borne by England, were added to ‘India Debt’.
When the Crown brought India under its direct rule in 1858 the Company's capital was paid off by loans which were added to ‘India Debt’. Thus, Dutt observed, "the people of India were made to pay the purchase money for the transfer of empire from the Company to the Crown!"
The most unjust payment India was forced to make was towards Britain's military expeditions outside India, in territories far and near like Afghanistan, Persia, Tibet, Burma, Malay Peninsula, China and Eygpt. These expenses were added to ‘India Debt’.
In 1860 ‘India Debt’ almost touched the £100 million mark and enormous interest had to be paid on this unjust debt. It was to pay this increasing interest that the new taxes in the form of Licence tax and Income tax were introduced for the first time in 1858.
"The government of a people by itself," said John Stuart Mill," has a meaning and a reality, but such a thing as government of one people by another does not, and cannot, exist. One people may keep another for its own use, a place to make money in, a human cattle farm to be worked for the profits of its own inhabitants."
'Home Charges', sent to England showed that to England, India was one large human cattle-farm.

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