Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

But the British paid no heed to the sentiments of the people and the partition of Bengal became a reality on October 10, 1905. The British probably thought the people would accept it as a fait accompli and set aside their agitation. But they were proved wrong. Instead of dying out, the campaign against partition became intensified.
The idea of boycotting British goods spread like wildfire through Bengal and then to different parts of the country. In many places, people not only decided not to buy foreign goods but also to burn all the foreign goods they already possessed. The boycott was given a new dimension when people imposed a social boycott on those who were reluctant to switch over to Swadeshi.
The boycott was extended to the British system of education too. National education was offered with the opening of national schools, national colleges and rashtriya vidyalayas in different parts of the country.
Indian literature, music and the arts of that period reflected the spirit of Swadeshi. The Swadeshi spirit had its impact on science and industry too.
The agitation against the partition of Bengal did not remain confined to Bengal. It spread to all parts of the country and for the first time the people of India behaved like the people of one nation. Such a thing had never happened before since the arrival of the British, not even during the great uprising of 1857, when the non-combatants had remained mere spectators and the South, largely unsympathetic. This time people from Punjab to Madras and from Bombay to Calcutta were caught up in the mood of rebellion.
1905 was, therefore, clearly a watershed in the history of the Independence movement. Before 1905, all protests against British rule were isolated developments. After 1905, the movement against the British assumed national dimensions.
Instead of dividing the people, the partition of Bengal united a nation. In the words of Abdul Rasul, president of Barisal Conference in 1906 : "What we could not have accomplished in 50 or 100 years, the great disaster, the Partition of Bengal, has done for us in six months."

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