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Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Behind Dyer's procession came a lad of fourteen or fifteen, banging on an empty kerosene can and announcing a meeting the next day at Jallianwala Bagh in defiance of the prohibitory orders.
Notwithstanding its name, Jallianwala Bagh was not a bagh, a garden but an open ground surrounded by the high walls of the buildings around it. It was accessed by a narrow lane. Within the bagh stood three peepal trees, a broken-down tomb and a well.
Sunday, 13 April 1919 was Baisakhi Day. A large number of peasants who had come from the neighbouring villages to celebrate Baisakhi were resting in the bagh. Some men from the neighbourhood were playing cards and dice and idly watching the proceedings of the meeting that was underway near the well. The meeting had attracted thousands of people from all walks of life. Two resolutions were passed — one called for the repeal of the Rowlatt Act and the other condemned the firings on the crowd three days earlier. Some speeches were made and a poet called on his countrymen to be prepared to shed blood for their motherland, little realising how close they were to actually doing so.
At around 5.15 the sound of heavy boots was heard. Dyer had arrived with his men. Some people got up to leave but one of the organisers, Hans Raj shouted: "Sit down, sit down. Don't be afraid, Government will never fire!"
Meanwhile the government was getting ready to do just that. General Dyer barked out orders to his men: "Gurkhas, right, 59th left. Fire!"
The 50 soldiers — 25 Gurkhas and 25 from the 59th Rifles Frontier Force — started firing. There were no warning shots. They shot to kill, right from the start. As the only exit was blocked by the soldiers the people could not leave by that way. Screams of pain and shouts of terror rent the air as men, women and children ran for the walls, falling over each other and getting trampled in the process. Many jumped into the well to escape the bullets but ended up drowning. The firing stopped only when the men ran out of ammunition. Then Dyer calmly ordered his troops to withdraw. The soldiers marched away leaving behind a scene of carnage. More than 1500 people, among them women and children, lay dead or wounded.
When darkness fell, the wounded cried out for water but the night curfew was in force and help was a long time in coming. Dyer did not bother to organise medical aid for the wounded. He thought he had struck a blow for the Empire. Little did he realise that he had sounded its death knell.

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