Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Could Indians fight for others while they themselves were not free?
The Viceroy gave vague assurances for the future which did not satisfy anyone. The Congress disassociated itself from the war efforts and the Congress ministries in the provinces resigned.
Gandhiji launched the individual satyagraha to press for freedom to speak out against the war. Acharya Vinoba Bhave was the first one to court arrest, on 21 October 1940, followed by Jawaharlal Nehru, Maulana Azad, Rajagopalachari and hundreds of Congress volunteers.
Subhas Chandra Bose was arrested for expressing the view that India would gain if Britain were defeated in the war.
Bose who had been elected president of the Congress for a second term in 1939 and had shortly afterwards resigned because of differences with senior Congress leaders, was convinced that Britain could be dislodged from India only by force of arms. When he was released from prison due to ill-health, he felt the time had come to put his plans into action and left the country.
In 1941, the war-time Prime Minister of Britain, Winston Churchill and President Roosevelt of America, issued a joint statement which came to be known as the Atlantic Charter. Article III of the Charter stated that England and America respect the "right of people to choose the form of government under which they will live" and that they wanted "sovereign rights and self-government restored to those who have been forcibly deprived of them".
These were the sort of assurances India wanted in exchange for her help in the war but they were not forthcoming. Churchill made it clear that the charter applied only to Europe.
On 7 December, 1941, Japan attacked Pearl Harbour. In the next few days they bombed Singapore and occupied Malaya and Thailand and suddenly, the war which had till then seemed far away, confined to Europe and North Africa, was at India's door- step.
At America's insistence Britain once again tried to get the support of Congress for the war. Sir Stafford Cripps arrived in India in March 1942 with fresh proposals but Gandhiji was not impressed. He called the proposals "a post-dated cheque". To which a reporter added "…on a bank that is failing."
Even Englishmen friendly to India were confused. They could not understand why India was adamant in refusing to support Britain when her own security was threatened by the expansionist aims of the Japanese.
But Gandhiji was convinced that India could work out her own solution to the Japanese threat. He called upon British troops to withdraw from India. In a terse statement, Gandhiji told Britain: "Leave India to God — or to anarchy."

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