Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Between 1908 and 1918 nearly 200 revolutionaries were killed or convicted. The heroes and martyrs of this period included Sushil Kumar Sen who at the age of fifteen was given 15 lashes of the whip for striking a police sergeant. The fact that the policeman was beating up innocent people when Sushil struck him was not taken into account by the magistrate, Mr. Kingsford.
Sushil Kumar died tragically a few years later on 2nd May 1915. He and a friend had committed a dacoity to raise money for revolutionary activities and were fleeing from the police in a boat. Suddenly shots rang out and Sushil Kumar was struck by a bullet. He knew that his end was near but did not want to be taken alive. He requested his companion to throw him overboard after cutting off his head so that he would not be identified and his relatives and friends, harassed. This his friend reluctantly did. Sushil Kumar was 23 years old at the time of his death.
On 30th April 1908 a bomb was thrown on a horse-driven coach. The intended victim was the magistrate Kingsford who was hated for the harsh sentences he handed down to captured revolutionaries. But Kingsford was not in the coach and two English ladies were killed instead. The police gave hot chase to the two teenagers who had thrown the bomb. Prafulla, real name Dinesh Chandra Roy, was apprehended at a railway station. The youngster whipped out a pistol and to the horror of the policemen, shot himself. He was about 17 years old.
His companion, Khudiram Bose was later arrested and tried and sentenced to death by hanging. He was 17. Two years earlier he had been jailed for possessing and distributing literature on Swadeshi.
Khudiram expressed regret at the death of the two innocent women and when asked if he was afraid to die, said he wasn't. He ascended the gallows without flinching.
To the British, Khudiram Bose and the others who waged war against the government were terrorists. But to their countrymen they were revolutionaries, brave sons of the soil. Modern historians like Bipin Chandra describe their activities as revolutionary terrorism ('for want of a better term'). But whatever their label, no one questioned their love for their country or their motives. When the revolutionary Kanailal Datta was hanged, his dead body, according to the historian, R.C. Majumdar, "was carried in a funeral procession which kings and conquering heroes might envy."

       Go to   Previous Page

Liked This Article? Then Rate It.

 Select A
 DIMDIMA Site

 

 


Terms of Use | Site Map | Privacy Policy | Testimonials | Feedback | About Us | Contact Us |  Link to Us | Links | Advertise with Us
Copyright © 2014 dimdima.com. All Rights Reserved.