Digital Dimdima
Under One Flag
The Light Has Gone Out
India Wins Freedom
Apostle of Peace
The Last War of Independence
Quit India
Leave India to God… or to Anarchy
Gandhi and Ambedkar
A Pinch of Salt!
Saga of Indian Revolutionaries
Bardoli
Gandhiji Withdraws from Political Activities
The Himalayan Blunder
A People Reject Their Rulers
Jallianwala — The Aftermath
Massacre at Jallianwala Bagh
The Gentle Satyagrahi
Gandhi in Champaran
Carrot and Stick
Revolutionaries Outside India
Heroes and Martyrs
Gandhi in South Africa
From Swadeshi to Swaraj
Swadeshi Enterprise
The New Spirit of India
The Great Divide
Partition of Bengal
The Battle is Taken to the Legislature!
The Monk Who Shook The Nation
Father of Indian Unrest
An Old Man's Dream
Women : Crossing the Threshold
The Battle Lines are Drawn
The Battle For A Free Press
Pressing On !
Europeans Take To The Street!
The British Raj in Black and White
Mamool Raj
The One-Man Army
Hunger Deaths
The Delhi Durbar
Return to Swadeshi
Barbarous Britannia
‘Rani Ka Hookum’
Perishing in Peace
The Blue Mutiny
English Education
The Trial of the Last Emperor
Roll of Honour
The Empire Strikes Back
British Authority Collapses
Sepoys on the Move
Tribal Uprisings
The Empire Builders
For God and Country

Hindu-Muslim unity was another obsession with Gandhi. The Khilafat movement lost its relevance when in Turkey, Kamal Pasha forced the Sultan into exile and set out to europeanize the country. Following these developments the brief honeymoon between Hindus and Muslims so evident during the non-cooperation movement came to an end. Hindu-Muslim clashes became more frequent. Small things like a Hindu procession passing in front of a mosque at prayer time or a Muslim slaughtering a cow could set off a communal riot. Gandhi decided to pray and fast to bring the two communities closer. Announcing his intention on Sept. 18, 1924, Gandhiji said in a statement: "Nothing evidently which I say or write can bring two communities together and I am therefore imposing on myself a 21 day fast from today... It is both a penance and a prayer..."
Gandhiji fasted at the home of Mohamed Ali. The two physicians in constant attendance were Muslims. 'Charlie' Andrews who served as nurse was a Christian missionary. On the twelfth day of the fast Gandhiji wrote in Young India, "Hitherto it has been a struggle and a yearning for a change of heart among Englishmen who compose the government of India. That change has still to come. But the struggle must for the moment be transferred to a change of heart among the Hindus and the Mussulmans. Before they dare think of freedom they must be brave enough to love one another, to tolerate one another's religion, even prejudices and superstitions, and to trust one another. This requires faith in oneself. And faith in oneself is faith in God. If we have that faith we shall cease to fear one another."
On October 6, on the completion of the 21-day fast Dr. Ansari offered him a glass of orange juice which the Mahatma drank.
Gandhiji resumed his tours to propagate khadi. He refused to be drawn into politics. He ignored the Simon Commission which arrived in India in February 1928 and did not even mention it in any of his speeches.
The Simon Commission was to tour India, talk to various leaders and suggest changes in the Indian political system. No one in the country wanted to talk to the commission which was supposed to determine the future of the country but had no Indian as a member. Wherever it went the commission was greeted with black flags. Many Indian leaders including Lala Lajpat Rai, Jawaharlal Nehru and Gobind Ballab Pant received lathi blows while holding demonstrations against the commission. Unfortunately Lajpat Rai succumbed to the injuries he received during a lathi charge and this resulted in a violent backlash in the form of revolutionary activities.

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